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Severity of pronation and classification of first metatarsophalangeal joint dorsiflexion increases the validity of the Hubscher Manoeuvre for the diagnosis of functional hallux limitus.

Gatt, Alfred and Mifsud, Tiziana and CHOCKALINGAM, Nachiappan (2014) Severity of pronation and classification of first metatarsophalangeal joint dorsiflexion increases the validity of the Hubscher Manoeuvre for the diagnosis of functional hallux limitus. Foot (Edinburgh, Scotland). ISSN 1532-2963

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Abstract or description

BACKGROUND

Functional hallux limitus (FHL) is diagnosed with a static test known as the Hubscher Manoeuvre, the validity of which has been previously questioned.

OBJECTIVES

To investigate the validity of this Manoeuvre and whether introducing severity of pronation as a second concurrent test would increase this validity.

METHOD

30 participants with a hallux dorsiflexion <12° were divided into 2 equal groups, depending on their severity of pronation according to the Foot Posture Index. A single video camera, placed perpendicular to the plane of motion of the 1st MPJ, captured its movement, from which the angle of maximum dorsiflexion of this joint was measured.

RESULTS

10 males and 20 females, aged 18-56 years (mean 28yrs, SD ±12.1yrs) participated. There was no significant relationship between non-weight bearing and dynamic maximum dorsiflexion (p=0.160), and between weight bearing and dynamic maximum dorsiflexion (p=0.865). A significant relationship between 1st MPJ dynamic maximum dorsiflexion and severity of pronation (p=0.004) was found.

CONCLUSIONS

None of the participants exhibited a complete lack of hallux dorsiflexion. A positive Hubscher Manoeuvre test, on its own, is not a good indicator of limited 1st MPJ dorsiflexion during dynamic motion. However, as pronation increases, 1st MPJ maximum dorsiflexion during gait decreases.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: A900 Others in Medicine and Dentistry
B800 Medical Technology
B900 Others in Subjects allied to Medicine
C600 Sports Science
Faculty: Faculty of Health Sciences > Psychology, Sport and Exercise
Depositing User: Nachiappan CHOCKALINGAM
Date Deposited: 06 Aug 2014 08:25
Last Modified: 06 Aug 2014 08:25
URI: http://eprints.staffs.ac.uk/id/eprint/1914

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