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The acute effect of upper-body complex training on power output of martial art athletes as measured by the bench press throw exercise

Liossis, Loudovikos and FORSYTH, Jacky (2013) The acute effect of upper-body complex training on power output of martial art athletes as measured by the bench press throw exercise. Journal of Human Kinetics, 39. pp. 177-183. ISSN 1899-7562

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Abstract or description

The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effect of upper body complex training on power output, as well as to determine the requisite preload intensity and intra-complex recovery interval needed to induce power output increases. Nine amateur-level combat/martial art athletes completed four distinct experimental protocols, which consisted of 5 bench press repetitions at either: 65% of one-repetition maximum (1RM) with a 4-min rest interval; 65% of 1RM with an 8-min rest; 85% of 1RM with a 4-min rest; or 85% of 1RM with an 8-min rest interval, performed on different days. Before (pre-conditioning) and after (post-conditioning) each experimental protocol, three bench press throws at 30% of 1RM were performed. Significant differences in power output pre-post conditioning were observed across all experimental protocols (F=26.489, partial eta2=0.768, p=0.001). Mean power output significantly increased when the preload stimulus of 65% 1RM was matched with 4 min of rest (p=0.001), and when the 85% 1RM preload stimulus was matched with 8 min of rest (p=0.001). Moreover, a statistically significant difference in power output was observed between the four conditioning protocols (F= 21.101, partial eta²=0.913, p=0.001). It was concluded that, in complex training, matching a heavy preload stimulus with a longer rest interval, and a lighter preload stimulus with a shorter rest interval is important for athletes wishing to increase their power production before training or competition.

Item Type: Article
Faculty: Previous Faculty of Health Sciences > Psychology, Sport and Exercise
Depositing User: Jacky FORSYTH
Date Deposited: 21 Oct 2016 11:50
Last Modified: 21 Oct 2016 11:50
URI: http://eprints.staffs.ac.uk/id/eprint/2663

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