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The Importance of Incorporating Neuroscientific Knowledge Into Counselling Psychology: An Introduction to Affective Neuroscience

GOSS, David (2015) The Importance of Incorporating Neuroscientific Knowledge Into Counselling Psychology: An Introduction to Affective Neuroscience. Counselling Psychology Review, 30 (1). pp. 52-63. ISSN 0269-6975

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Abstract or description

Content and focus - Neuroscience as a whole has seen great advancements over the last couple of decades and as such, it is becoming an increasingly important and relevant knowledgebase for counselling psychologists to incorporate into their research and practice. Affective neuroscience focuses on the emotions and affect which are both produced and perceived by the brain and mind. Jaak Panksepp, a prominent figure within affective neuroscience, has suggested that one avenue which is ripe for advancement is the development of primary process understanding. This paper discusses primary brain processes as well outlining a number of introductory ways in which affective neuroscience could contribute to counselling psychology.
Conclusions - It is suggested that counselling psychologists are well placed to contribute to affective neuroscience research. Additionally, psychiatry is well placed to benefit and add to the body of knowledge within affective neuroscience therefore the present work proposes that the time is now for greater collaboration between counselling psychologists, psychiatrists and (affective) neuroscientists, contributing and working together with the aim of increasing understanding and the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions for our species’ mental health and development.

Item Type: Article
Faculty: Faculty of Health Sciences > Psychology, Sport and Exercise
Depositing User: David GOSS
Date Deposited: 01 Nov 2016 09:31
Last Modified: 16 Nov 2016 16:27
URI: http://eprints.staffs.ac.uk/id/eprint/2809

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