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Problematic Video Game Play and ADHD Traits in an Adult Population

PANAGIOTIDI, Maria (2017) Problematic Video Game Play and ADHD Traits in an Adult Population. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 20 (5). pp. 292-295. ISSN 2152-2715

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Abstract or description

This study examined the relationship between problematic video game play (PVGP), video game usage, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) traits in an adult population. A sample of 205 healthy adult volunteers completed the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS), a video game usage questionnaire, and the Problem Video Game Playing Test (PVGT). A significant positive correlation was found between the ASRS and the PVGT. More specifically, inattention symptoms and time spent playing video games were the best predictors of PVGP. No relationship was found between frequency and duration of play and ADHD traits. Hyperactivity symptoms were not associated with PVGP. Our results suggest that there is a positive relationship between ADHD traits and problematic video game play. In particular, adults with higher level of self-reported inattention symptoms could be at higher risk of PVGP.

Item Type: Article
Faculty: School of Life Sciences and Education > Psychology
Depositing User: Maria PANAGIOTIDI
Date Deposited: 17 May 2017 12:54
Last Modified: 18 May 2017 13:07
URI: http://eprints.staffs.ac.uk/id/eprint/3073

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