Staffordshire University logo
STORE - Staffordshire Online Repository

The effect of three different toe props on plantar pressure and patient comfort

Johnson, Sarah and BRANTHWAITE, Helen and NAEMI, Roozbeh and CHOCKALINGAM, Nachiappan (2012) The effect of three different toe props on plantar pressure and patient comfort. Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, 5 (1). p. 22. ISSN 1757-1146

[img]
Preview
Text
1757-1146-5-22.pdf

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract or description

Background
Arthritic toe pathologies frequently lead to the development of painful apical pressure skin lesions that can compromise gait and affect quality of life. Historically conservative treatments involve the use of a toe prop with the intended aim of reducing plantar pressure from the apex of the digit. However, the effect of toe prop treatment on plantar digital pressure has not been investigated.

Method
Twenty two subjects were recruited with lesser digital deformities and associated apical skin lesions. Individual pressure sensors were placed on the apices of the lesser toes and pressure was recorded under three toe prop conditions (leather, gel and silicone mould). A modified comfort index was utilised to assess the comfort of each condition.

Results
Significant difference (p < 0.05) in mean peak pressure was observed at the apex of the 2nd toe when using the gel (p < 0.001) and silicone (p < 0.001) toe prop compared to no toe prop. There was also a significant difference in the mean pressure time integral at the apex of the 2nd toe when using gel (p < 0.001) and silicone (p < 0.004) toe props. There was no significant correlation between comfort and the recorded peak pressures. However, there was an indication that the silicone toe prop was more comfortable.

Conclusion
As compared to the leather and silicone mould toe props, gel toe props were found to be the most effective for reducing peak pressure and pressure time integral on the apex of the second digit in patients with claw or hammer toe deformity.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: A900 Others in Medicine and Dentistry
Faculty: Previous Faculty of Health Sciences > Psychology, Sport and Exercise
Depositing User: Helen BRANTHWAITE
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2013 10:11
Last Modified: 15 Nov 2013 12:49
URI: http://eprints.staffs.ac.uk/id/eprint/364

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

DisabledGo Staffordshire University is a recognised   Investor in People. Sustain Staffs
Legal | Freedom of Information | Site Map | Job Vacancies
Staffordshire University, College Road, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire ST4 2DE t: +44 (0)1782 294000