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Feeding infants with Down's Syndrome: A qualitative study of mothers' experiences

BOATH, Elizabeth and CARTWRIGHT, Angela (2018) Feeding infants with Down's Syndrome: A qualitative study of mothers' experiences. Journal of Neonatal Nursing. ISSN 1355-1841

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Abstract or description

Objective
Breastfeeding may have general and specific advantages for both mothers and infants with Down Syndrome (IDS). The experiences and needs of mothers of IDS have not previously been explored, hence the aim of this study.

Design
Qualitative, with data collection via focus groups. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to elicit the meanings participants attributed to their experiences.

Participants
Eight mothers of IDS participated in two focus groups.

Setting
United Kingdom (UK).

Findings
Five key themes emerged from the data

1) Importance of feeding choices and methods for IDS.

2) Guilt regarding feeding IDS.

3) Health professionals were “Out of their depth”.

4) Lack of recognition of difference of IDS and typical infants.

5) Power and control of health professionals.

Key conclusions and implications for practice
Best practice from existing literature and this study is suggested, alongside the need for future research.

Item Type: Article
Faculty: School of Health and Social Care > Nursing
Depositing User: Library STORE team
Date Deposited: 20 Apr 2018 11:38
Last Modified: 20 Apr 2018 11:38
URI: http://eprints.staffs.ac.uk/id/eprint/4325

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