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“Living in a foreign country”: Experiences of staff-patient communication in inpatient stroke settings for people with post stroke aphasia and those supporting them

Clancy, Louise, POVEY, Rachel and RODHAM, Karen (2018) “Living in a foreign country”: Experiences of staff-patient communication in inpatient stroke settings for people with post stroke aphasia and those supporting them. Disability and Rehabilitation. ISSN 0963-8288 (In Press)

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Abstract or description

Purpose: Staff-patient communication in in-patient stroke settings is viewed as challenging for stroke survivors with aphasia and those supporting them. This study sought to explore these experiences from the perspectives of stroke survivors, their carers and healthcare professionals.

Methods: A qualitative study where stroke survivors with aphasia, carers and healthcare professionals were interviewed (audio recorded) one-to-one or via focus group. Stroke survivors were at least 6 months post-stroke and had a self-reported mild to moderate level of post-stroke aphasia. Transcripts for each group were analysed separately using inductive thematic analysis; followed by an integrative analysis.

Results: Six stroke survivors with aphasia, ten carers, and six healthcare professionals were recruited. Three overarching themes were identified: ‘being in a foreign country’, ‘finding a voice’, and ‘you’re just a number’. A dynamic model of communication is proposed offering a framework for understanding the relationships between ‘the context’, ‘the people’ and ‘the interactions’.

Conclusions: Communication was viewed as important but challenging by all three groups. To maximise staff-patient interactions in the future, attention needs to be paid to: the psychosocial needs of stroke survivors and their carers, ongoing staff training and support for the healthcare professionals supporting them, and the provision of an aphasia-friendly and a communicatively stimulating ward environment.

Item Type: Article
Faculty: School of Life Sciences and Education > Psychology
Depositing User: Karen RODHAM
Date Deposited: 07 Aug 2018 09:02
Last Modified: 09 Aug 2018 08:54
URI: http://eprints.staffs.ac.uk/id/eprint/4614

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