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An acute bout of self-myofascial release does not affect drop jump performance despite an increase in ankle range of motion

GODWIN, Mark, STANHOPE, Edward, BATEMAN, James and MILLS, Holly (2020) An acute bout of self-myofascial release does not affect drop jump performance despite an increase in ankle range of motion. SPORTS, 8 (3). ISSN 2075-4663

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Abstract or description

This study examined the acute effects of self-myofascial release plus dynamic warm up versus dynamic warm up alone on ankle range of motion and drop jump performance. Twenty-five recreationally active participants (male: 16, female: 9) were randomly assigned into a foam rolling (FR) or a dynamic warm up group (CON) (age: 22.8 ± 3.9 years, body mass 75.9 ± 13.2 kg, stretch stature: 174.1 ± 10.1 cm). In a randomised crossover design, each participant completed two experimental sessions separated by 7 days. Ankle range of movement was assessed using a weight-bearing lunge test and drop jump performance was recorded via bilateral force plates. Following a 5 min cycle, the foam rolling group undertook self-myofascial release to the lower limb and thoracic/lumbar regions, followed by a dynamic warm up. The control group undertook the same initial warm up plus the dynamic exercises. The level of significance was set at p  0.05. There was a significant increase (p < 0.001) in ankle range of motion immediately after the warm up for both groups (pre CON: 37.5 ± 5.31, post CON: 39.8 ± 5.76; pre FR 38.7 ± 7, post FR: 40.3 ± 7.3 deg). No significant difference was found between the conditions (p > 0.05). There were no significant differences for any indices of jump performance (p > 0.05). Based on these results, foam rolling plus dynamic exercises does not appear to impair or enhance drop jump performance despite increases in ankle range of movement.

Item Type: Article
Faculty: School of Life Sciences and Education > Sport and Exercise
Depositing User: Edward STANHOPE
Date Deposited: 06 Mar 2020 15:11
Last Modified: 14 May 2020 09:58
URI: http://eprints.staffs.ac.uk/id/eprint/6194

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