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A systematic review of recruitment strategies and behaviour change techniques in group-based diabetes prevention programmes focusing on uptake and retention

Begum, Sonia, POVEY, Rachel, ELLIS, Naomi and GIDLOW, Christopher (2020) A systematic review of recruitment strategies and behaviour change techniques in group-based diabetes prevention programmes focusing on uptake and retention. Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice. ISSN 0168-8227 (In Press)

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Abstract or description

Background: Many countries worldwide have developed diabetes prevention programmes (DPPs) that involve lifestyle modification. Research has shown that uptake and retention of DPPs are important and by exploring recruitment strategies and behaviour change techniques (BCTs) used, factors that are most effective in promoting uptake and retention can be identified. Objectives: This review aims to identify recruitment strategies of group-based DPPs that are associated with high uptake and common BCTs associated with high retention. Methods: Papers were identified with a systematic literature search. Programmes that were predominantly group-based and involved lifestyle modification and in which uptake and/or retention could be determined, were included. Intervention details were extracted, recruitment strategies and BCTs identified, and response, uptake and retention rates were calculated. Results: A range of recruitment strategies were used making it difficult to discern associations with uptake rates. For BCTs, all programmes used a credible source, 81% used instruction on how to perform a behaviour and 71% used goal setting (behaviour). BCTs more commonly found in high retention programmes included problem-solving, demonstrating the behaviour, using behavioural practice and reducing negative emotions. Conclusions: Recommendations include that DPPs incorporate BCTs like problem-solving and demonstrating the behaviour to maximise retention.

Item Type: Article
Faculty: School of Life Sciences and Education > Psychology
Depositing User: Rachel POVEY
Date Deposited: 23 Jun 2020 15:14
Last Modified: 21 Jul 2020 10:57
URI: http://eprints.staffs.ac.uk/id/eprint/6386

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