Staffordshire University logo
STORE - Staffordshire Online Repository

Digitally captured signatures: A method for the normalization of force through calibration and the use of the zeta function

KALANTZIS, Nikolaos and PLATT, Andrew (2021) Digitally captured signatures: A method for the normalization of force through calibration and the use of the zeta function. Journal of Forensic Sciences. ISSN 1556-4029

[img] Text
JOFS-21-433.R2_Proof_hi.pdf - AUTHOR'S ACCEPTED Version (default)
Restricted to Repository staff only until 3 November 2022.
Available under License All Rights Reserved (Under Embargo).

Download (3MB) | Request a copy

Abstract or description

Digitally captured signatures (DCS) are entering the scope of the Forensic Handwriting Examiner (FHE), and the meaningful comprehension and comparison of the captured information is essential in order to proceed to the examination of authenticity of DCS. In DCS solutions, force is captured and presented as pressure levels, but the relation between exercised force and the assigned pressure levels is not provided by the manufacturers of these solutions. For this purpose, we constructed an experimental array that allows the correlation of exercised force and assigned pressure levels, in a combination of three different digitizers, six different styli and four different capturing software. This process let us calculate the correlation function that assigns pressure levels to force for each solution (called the Zeta Function). Through this process, it was observed that different solutions follow different Zeta functions. To address this problem, a methodology for normalization of captured data between different solutions was created and demonstrated, using the calculated Zeta function and its inverse.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: "This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Kalantzis, N, Platt, AWG. Digitally captured signatures: A method for the normalization of force through calibration and the use of the zeta function. J Forensic Sci. 2021; 00: 1– 18. , which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/1556-4029.14927. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. This article may not be enhanced, enriched or otherwise transformed into a derivative work, without express permission from Wiley or by statutory rights under applicable legislation. Copyright notices must not be removed, obscured or modified. The article must be linked to Wiley’s version of record on Wiley Online Library and any embedding, framing or otherwise making available the article or pages thereof by third parties from platforms, services and websites other than Wiley Online Library must be prohibited."
Faculty: School of Law, Policing and Forensics > Forensic Sciences and Policing
Depositing User: Library STORE team
Date Deposited: 19 Nov 2021 15:55
Last Modified: 19 Nov 2021 15:55
URI: https://eprints.staffs.ac.uk/id/eprint/7086

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

DisabledGo Staffordshire University is a recognised   Investor in People. Sustain Staffs
Legal | Freedom of Information | Site Map | Job Vacancies
Staffordshire University, College Road, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire ST4 2DE t: +44 (0)1782 294000